About Greenopedia

In an ideal world, every product on store shelves would nurture our bodies and the environment. Each would be designed and manufactured in a way that protects the wellbeing of the workers and animals that created it. Every label would be explained clearly and simply. And every industry would be properly regulated to ensure the health, safety, and longevity of its stakeholders.

Unfortunately we don’t live in an ideal world and we can’t wait for governments or brands to keep us safe. We need rely on our own knowledge and common sense to make safer, healthier and more sustainable choices. But there is a ton of information out there and it takes time to sift through it and figure it all out. And as important as it is, it isn’t easy to set aside the time from our busy schedules to do it.

I started Greeno a few years ago to help busy people like you (and me!) to better understand the foods we eat and the products we bring into our homes. My goal was to figure out how to navigate the endless stream of confusing labels and marketing claims that compel us to buy products… products that make our lives easier, yet at the same time, harm our health, the environment, and the animals and workers who make those products possible.

Through my time and research, I found that there are plenty of safer, healthier and more sustainable alternatives that are just as convenient and effective as their unhealthier counterparts. Often times these smaller brands don’t have the same budgets as multinationals, so their products just aren’t as well-marketed or as widely available in stores. Luckily, most are available online and with a bit of hunting, most can be found right on Amazon.

So until the ideal world is a reality, I hope that you take advantage of my research efforts and enjoy what you learn. Please share the important stuff with friends and family, and use the comment section of each article to contribute your knowledge and any questions you may have.

Where does the information come from?
Each topic on Greenopedia is well researched, primarily through published scientific studies, government standards, industry experts, and user forums. The articles then break down the vast, and often technical information, and present topics in a more casual way that is faster and easier to digest.

To close the loop, each article links to a group of products or services that have been specifically curated for that article, and carefully vetted to ensure they meet the higher standards you’ve just learned about.

Where do the products come from?
Nearly everyone these days has an account with Amazon.com and nearly every seller, large and small, has a presence there. So to make things easier for everyone, most of the products featured on Greenopedia have been curated directly from Amazon.

The prices are exactly the same, whether you find the products on your own through Amazon or shop them already curated through Greeno. But if you do shop them through us, then we earn a commission, which helps to pay the bills and keep the site running.

Either way, you’ll checkout on Amazon, so if you already have an account, the process will be fast, easy and secure.

And yes, if you participate in Amazon Prime, then you’ll receive those same benefits through Greenopedia.

Services that are not part of Amazon.com have been manually added to the site. These pages are more difficult to maintain, so if you find a link that is broken or a company that no longer exists, please help the community out by letting me know. Thanks!

[avatar user=”sherylryan” size=”100″ align=”left”][/avatar]

Sheryl Ryan
Founder & main contributor to Greenopedia